Butterflies Of Henry W. Coe State Park

 

What is a butterfly?

Any of various insects of the order Lepidoptera, characteristically having slender bodies, knobbed antennae, and four broad, usually colorful wings. Butterflies typically rest with their wings closed over their backs.

500px-butterfly_parts500px-butterfly_wing_terms

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The tables that follow contain lists of butterflies that can be found in Henry W. Coe State Park. The first table contains all the families of butterflies. Each family also has at least one table containing names of butterflies found in that family. If you select a butterfly by name you will be taken to a photo of that butterfly and a brief description. You will also find links to more detailed descriptions and information and also to more photos if any are available.

Swallowtails Whites and Sulphurs Gossamer-wing Butterflies
Metalmarks Brush-footed Butterflies Skippers

Swallowtail Butterflies (Family Papilionidae)

Any of various butterflies of the genus Papilio and related genera having a tail-like extension of each hind wing: family Papilionidae.

Swallowtails (Subfamily Papilioninae)
California Pipevine Swallowtail Anise Swallowtail Western Tiger Swallowtail
Two-tailed Swallowtail Pale Swallowtail
 
       California Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor hirsuta)

ld_butterfly_3_smallDescription: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 2 and 4 inches. Both surfaces of the forewings are black or dull blackish-brown. The dorsal hindwing is where the males and females are noticeably different. Males have smaller cream or pale spots than females, and the spots run along the fringe of the wings. Males are also a brighter metallic blue than their female counterparts in the dorsal hindwing region. The bottom half of the ventral hindwing of males and females is metallic blue; a single row of seven orange spots and small pale, cream dots are found at the edge of the wing within the metallic blue section.

Often occurs along streams or woodlands where pipevine host grows. Flight can be spring to fall with the biggest flight in many areas late March to early May.

Occurrence at Coe: Stray

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         Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon)

aniseswallowtail_smallDescription: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 2 1/2 and 3 1/2 inches. The upper and lower sides of the wings are black but the upperwing has a broad yellow stripe across it giving the butterfly an overall yellow appearance. There are blue spots on the rear edge of the hindwing and the characteristic tails of the swallowtail. The upper surface of the hindwing has a yellow-orange eyespot near the tail with a round black center that is not connected to the hindwing margin.

Hilltops, ridges and areas where fennels and other hosts in the carrot family occur. Main flight in spring in the wild in the Coast Ranges. One to three broods, depending on locality in the state. Feeds on citrus in much of the state where it is multiple brooded.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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         Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)

westernswallowtail_smallDescription: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 2 3/4 and 4 inches. Both sides of this butterfly are bright yellow and edged with a thick black border. Each side of the butterfly is marked by four wide, diagonal and nearly parallel, black stripes with the innermost being the longest. On the hindwing there are narrow yellow spots along the wing's edge, an orange tint on two spots near the end of the inner edge, and blue spots all around the outer edge of the hindwing. There are yellow spots all along the black edge of the forewing. The hindwings have tails at their lower tips. The adult antennae are knobbed but never hooked at the tip.

Multiple brooded along streams at all elevations in the state outside the deserts below the Hudsonian Life Zone.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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         Two-tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudatus pusillus)

papilio_multicaudataDescription: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 3 1/2 and 5 inches. Both sides of this butterfly are yellow to orange-yellow and edged with a thick black border. Each side of the butterfly is marked by four wide, diagonal and nearly parallel, black stripes with the innermost being the longest. The hindwing has a curved row of blue patches; below the blue are several bars or spots of orange. There are also blue patches on the rear margin of the forewing. There are two tails extending from the rear of the hindwing, with the innermost tail considerably shorter.

Most likely to occur along streambeds and in canyons in mixed coniferous forests or foothill woodland. Often confused with Western Tiger Swallowtail. California populations are named for their smaller size than those of Arizona. Populations may be single brooded, double brooded or triple brooded. Flights in late summer tend to be very small. This species is rare in most of the state.

Occurrence at Coe: Likely

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         Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon)

paleswallowtail_76091_smallDescription: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 3 and 3 3/4 inches. The upper surface of the the wings is a creamy white and not yellow. The upper surface has bold, black stripes with a thick wing border. The forewings are very pointed. The hindwings are spotted with cream, blue, and orange. The wings are less brightly colored below with dark veins. The tail of the hindwing is long and twisted.

One or two broods in the spring with late summer broods in some parts of the state. Coast Range population tends to be a more yellow or cream colored butterfly. Adults occur in foothill woodland and in mixed coniferous forests, often along streams.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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Whites and Sulphurs Butterflies (Family Pieridae)

The Whites and Sulphurs include any of several species of butterflies in the family Pieridae that are found worldwide. Adults have wingspans of 1.5 to 2.5 inches. The patterns and color of many species vary with sex and season. The Whites have wings that are white with black marginal markings while the Sulphurs have wings that are generally bright yellow or orange.

Whites (Subfamily Pierinae)
 

Spring White Checkered White Large Veined White
Cabbage White Large Marble Pacific Orangetip


Sulphurs (Subfamily Coliadinae)
 

Orange Sulphur California Dogface
Cloudless Sulphur Dainty Sulphur
       
          Spring White (Pontia sisymbrii sisymbrii)

springwhite_63799_smallDescription: This is a small sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 3/4 inches. The wings are white to creamy yellow in color with dark veins. The dark vein markings on the hindwing underside are not connected laterally and may be edged widely with olive. Females have a yellow flush to them.

Likely on the west slopes of the park. Likely missing from the Inner Coast Ranges. Flight late February into May.

Occurrence at Coe: Likely

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         Checkered White (Pontia protodice)

pontia_protodice_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 2 1/2 inches. The wings are white with black markings. The forewing has two large black patches, and a black border marked with white triangles. The hindwing is also bordered with black; the border is interrupted with white triangle or diamond shaped spots. The underside can vary from nearly all white with a few brown spots to white spotted with brown on the forewing and striped with brown or grayish green on the hindwing. It varies considerably in the intensity of its markings, both between the sexes and seasonally.

Likely one of the commonest butterflies in the park. Thrives in dry wastelands and in many habitats. Should be on both slopes in the Coast Ranges. Flight mid-February - November.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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         Large Veined White (Pieris marginalis venosa)

pieris_marginalis_1211_smallDescription: This a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/2 and 2 1/4 inches. The summer form is pure white above and below. Spring form has a black tipped upper forewing. Underside of the hindwing and apex of the forewing have veins edged with yellow-green or gray-green.

This larger heavily veined white should occur on the west side of the park at wetter and more heavily wooded areas in lower elevations. Flights as early as January or February but peaks in March and April, with lighter forms in May and after.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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         Cabbage White (Pieris rapae)

cabbagewhite_21250_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 2 1/2 inches. It is white or pale yellowish-white above with black tips on the forewings. The upperside of the female forewing has two black spots while the male has one. The hindwing of each sex also bears a black spot on the anterior edge. The underside of the forewing is white with a yellowish apex and two black discal spots in both sexes; underside of hindwing uniformly pale yellow in both sexes. The body of the butterfly is covered with dense hair, which is colored white in females, but darker in males.

Flies spring to fall in many habitats, often benefits from human development and home gardens.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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         Large Marble (Euchloe ausonides ausonides)

largemarble_381854_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/2 and 2 inches. The color is creamy to off-white above with a black network on the upper forewing tip. There is a rectangular black spot across the end of the forewing cell. Yellow veins and a rich, yellow-green marbling across the entire hindwing below in fairly separate bars and on the forewing tips below.

Populations west of the Sierra Nevada higher elevations are larger than subspecies transmontana in the Sierra Nevada at high elevations. These likely occur in wetter parts of the park if not limited to the coastal plain portion of the county. Flights may be one brood in the spring, possibly into early summer in wet years. Likely uncommon in the Stanislaus County portion of the park.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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         Pacific Orangetip (Anthocharis sara sara)

anthocharis_sara_15699_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/16 and 1 1/2 inches. The coloring is white above. Males have an orange spot with a dark narrow border in the apical area of the upper forewing. The female has a smaller orange spot with a dark border with white wedges. The underside of the hindwing has green-black mottling on a cream-colored background.

Common in the foothill woodland in woodland openings up into lower mixed coniferous forest, often along riparian areas in canyons. One or two broods (with second brood larger in size) late February into June.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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         Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme)

orangesulphur_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 3/8 and 2 3/4 inches. The upperside of the male is yellow with orange overlay, yellow veins, wide black border, and dark black cell spot. The female is yellow or white with an irregular black border surrounding light spots. The underside hindwing spot is silver with 2 concentric dark rings, and a spot above it.

General distribution in all habitats. Flight spring to fall.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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       California Dogface (Zerene eurydice)

californiadogface_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 2 and 2 1/2 inches. The male has a dark purplish-brown to black upper forewing with a yellow to pinkish-orange pattern resembling a poodle's head on the inner half. The upper hindwing is yellow or yellow-orange occasionally with a marginal black band. The female has a small black dot on each of its yellow forewings. Both males and females have solid yellow hindwings.

The state butterfly is probably locally common in the park where False Indigo (the larval host) occurs, usually Upper Sonoran and Transition Life Zones. Flight periods vary across the state, possible related to weather patterns and proximity to the coast. Single brooded in some areas, mutiple brooded in others.

Occurrence at Coe: Likely

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       Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae marcellina)

cloudlesssulphur_233754_smallDescription: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 2 1/4 and 3 1/8 inches. The upperside of the male wings are lemon yellow or pale greenish-yellow with no markings. The upperside of the female forewing has a small dark spot, usually a narrow blackish outer margin, and a few vague dark dots near the tip. The female coloring can be yellow or white. The underside of the hindwings have two silver, pink edged, spots in both sexes.

May stray into the park during rare migrations north. No records for Stanislaus County, but possible.

Occurrence at Coe: Stray

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      Dainty Sulphur (Nathalis iole)

daintysulphur_457878_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 3/4 and 1 1/4 inches. The forewings have a distinctive elongated shape. The upperside of the wings is yellow with the tip of the forewing being black. Black bars extend along the trailing edge of the forewing and the leading edge of the hindwing. Males have a reddish-orange scent patch in each hindwing bar. The underside color is variable ranging from yellowish to greenish-gray depending on the season.

Not recorded for Santa Clara County yet but possible this year in 2015 as this species has been regularly found in more southernly counties in the Coast Ranges.

Occurrence at Coe: Transient

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Gossamer-wing Butterflies (Family Lycaenidae)

The family is known as the Gossamer-wing butterflies because their wings, like the fabric, generally appear delicate and shimmery. Their wings are covered both by pigmented scales and by light-refracting scales. In California, they can be grouped into the coppers (subfamily Lycaeninae), the blues (subfamily Polyommatinae), and the hairstreaks (subfamily Theclinae). All are small to medium-sized butterflies (wingspan .4 to 1.2 inches) that are agile and delicate. In males the upper-wing surfaces are usually brightly colored and iridescent. The underwing patterns of both sexes are spotted or streaked and often have false eye-markings and trailing filaments on the hind wings that serve as decoys for predators.

Coppers (Subfamily Lycaeninae)
 

Tailed Copper Great Copper Gorgon Copper
Purplish Copper


Hairstreaks (Subfamily Theclinae)
 

Golden Hairstreak Great Purple Hairstreak California Hairstreak
Muir's Juniper Hairstreak Dryope Sylvan Hairstreak Gold-hunter's Hairstreak
Mountain Mahogany Hairstreak Hedge-Row Hairstreak Bramble Hairstreak
Gray Hairstreak Western Brown Elfin Thicket Hairstreak


Blues (Subfamily Polyommatinae)
 

Western Pygmy-Blue Eastern Tailed-Blue Western Tailed-Blue
Western Azure Sonoran Blue Lupine Blue
Bernardino Blue Pacific Dotted Blue Arrowhead Blue
Silvery Blue Acmon Blue Boisduval's Blue
Marine Blue
       
          Tailed Copper (Lycaena arota arota)

tailedcopper_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/8 and 1 3/8 inches. The upperside of the male is a copper-brown with an iridescent purple sheen. The upperside of the female has an orange and dark brown pattern. The underside of both both sexes is gray with black spots on the forewings and black scrawls and a band of white crescents on the hindwings. The hindwings of both sexes have a tail.

Should occur inside the park on either the west or east slopes where Ribes host grows. Often occurs in well watered spots in foothill woodland.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Bill Bouton 

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       Great Copper (Lycaena xanthoides xanthoides)

greatcopper_379116_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 3/4 inches. The upperside is gray with an orange band and black spots along edge of hindwing. The underside is tan with black spots. There is also an orange trim on the hindwing.

Should occur in wet meadows and pastures in foothill woodland where Rumex host grows. Flight May - June, early July in some years. Could occur in either county.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: iNaturalist  Copyright © 2009 iNaturalist

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         Gorgon Copper (Lycaena gorgon gorgon)

gorgoncopper_375610_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 1/2 inches. The upperside of the male is coppery-brown with a bright reddish-purple tinge. The upperside of the female is dark brown with cream and black spots. The upperside of the female hindwing has a row of orange crescents next to row of small back spots. The underside of both sexes is gray with black spots and a submarginal row of red-orange spots on the hindwing.

Occurs on drier slopes where the Eriogonum nudum host occurs in Upper Sonoran and Lower Transition Life Zones. Could likely occur on both western and eastern slopes of the Coast Ranges.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: iNaturalist Copyright © 2009 iNaturalist

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       Purplish Copper (Lycaena helloides helloides)

lycaena_helloides_male_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/8 and 1 1/2 inches. The upperside of the male is a dull copper-brown with a purple tinge and scattered black spots. The hindwing usually has prominent submarginal orange crescents. The margins of both wings narrowly darkened. The upperside of the female is orange to tawny with brown shading, brown margins and heavier dark spots. The hindwing has more prominent orange crescents than the male. The underside of the forewing of both sexes is an orange-yellow with black spots while the hindwing is a dull pinkish-tan to grayish-tan with fine black spots and a scalloped red submarginal band.

This is often a lowland species found in wet meadows and pastures with Rumex from late spring to late fall, often most common late in the season.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

Photo Credit: Tom Peterson, Fermilab  pd_cslash_small

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         Golden Hairstreak (Habrodais grunus lorquini)

goldenhairstreak_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside of the male is dark brown with a yellow tinge in the cell area of the forewing. The female is not as dark. The underside of both sexes is a yellow-brown with a narrow, dark, postmarginal line. The hindwing has thin gold crescents at the margin and the last two are iridescent. There are short tails on the hindwing.

Likely occurs near hosts (Canyon Live Oak, Tanoak, and Chinquapin) often near streams in foothill woodland and in mixed coniferous forests. Adults often perch high on the oaks but sometimes come down to visit mud and perch on nearby low vegetation. Flight late May - early September.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

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         Great Purple Hairstreak (Atlides halesus corcorani)

greatpurplehairstreak_29876_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 2 inches. The upperside of both the forewings and hindwings is an iridescent blue with black borders. The underside of both wings is brown with white and yellow spots on the margin of the hindwing. There are also three bright red spots, one on the forewing and two on the hindwing. The hindwing also has one short tail and one long tail. The top of the abdomen is blue and the bottom is bright red.

Usually seen sparingly at flowers in areas where the mistletoe host grows on deciduous trees and junipers. It should be in the park.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

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         California Hairstreak (Satyrium californica californica)

satyrium_californica_smallDescription:  This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside is brown with an orange spot on the hindwing near the tails. The outer edge of forewing usually has a row of orange spots. The underside is gray-brown with orange crescents and a postmedian band of black spots. Each hindwing has one long and one short tail.

Occurs in foothill woodland and in mixed coniferous forest. Likes to nectar at Yerba Santa and milkweeds. Flight April - early July.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Terry Spivey, USDA Forest Service  cc_by

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         Dryope Sylvan Hairstreak (Satyrium sylvinus dryope)

sylvanhairstreak_dryope_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 3/8 inches. The upperside is grayish brown or reddish with a bluish sheen on the darker sections of the wing and a yellowish sheen where it is lighter. The hindwing has a patch of orange near the trailing edge. The underside is grayish white and marked with a vertical row of black spots and sometimes second fainter row near the edge. The hindwing has a large orange spot and a grayish blue spot near the lower edge. The Dryope Hairstreak is identical to the Sylvan Hairstreak except it has no tails.

This is the untailed subspecies and some still believe dryope is a dull species. Adults perch on the larval host willows along streams or visit flowers, especially milkweed blossoms. Flight May to early September.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Jim Snyder Copyright © 2010 Jim Snyder

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         Gold-hunter's Hairstreak (Satyrium auretorum auretorum)

gold-huntershairstreak_62280_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside of the male is dark brown while the female has a yellowish tinge. The underside of the hindwing has dark crescents near the outer margin. There is a dull orange spot with a black center located near the a short tail.

Uses varies oaks in foothill woodland (sometimes mixed coniferous forest) for the larval host and often is out of sight on the oaks or visits nearby flowers including Horehound and Eriogonum fasciculatum flowers. Considered a very rare species but sometimes has population outbreaks. Flight mostly May - June.

Occurrence in Coe: Rare

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         Mountain Mahogany Hairstreak (Satyrium tetra)

mountainmahoganyhairstreak_131549_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside is brownish gray in both sexes. The underside is olive-gray with an ashy tinge. There is a postmedian white line which is sometimes faint or absent. There is a grayish blue spot near the tail. The male has one short hindwing tail while the female has a long tail. The tail may be missing.

This hairstreak tends to favor areas with recent burns and uses Mountain Mahogany as the larval host, hence its name. It usually occurs in foothill woodland, sometimes into teh Transition Life Zone. Adults frequent milkweeds, Yerba Santa and Eriogonum fasciculatum. The flight is May - July.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

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         Hedge-Row Hairstreak (Satyrium saepium chalcis)

hedgerowhairstreak_25759_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside is a bright coppery brown. The forewing of the male has a black oval spot along the leading edge. The underside is dull brown with a dark postmedian band and a blue spot near a short tail.

Foothill woodland with buckthorns, the larval host. Adults frequent flowers and hilltop on ridges. The flight is May - August. Often very common.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Tom Murray cc_by_nc_nd

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         Bramble Hairstreak (Callophrys dumetorum dumetorum)

coastalgreenhairstreak_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/8 inches. The upperside of the wings are gray. The underside of the wings have gray and a blue-green hue with white spots. This butterfly has no tails.

Should occur on the west slope of the park in association with deer weed or Eriogonum nudum, often in canyons with streams. Also likely in riparian canyons or slopes in the Inner Coast Range on the eastern slope. Flight late February into May.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Western Brown Elfin (Callophrys augustinus irioides)

callophrys_augustinus_2_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/8 inches. The upperside of the male is grayish brown while the female is reddish brown. The underside of both sexes is dark brown with dull reddish patches. There is a dark irregular postmedian line. This butterfly has no tails.

Often very common in Upper Sonoran and Transition Zones. Adults frequent spring blooming vegetation, visit wet spots and use several different host plants. Flight February into early July.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Thicket Hairstreak (Callophrys spinetorum spinetorum)

thickethairstreak_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside is a steel-blue. The underside is reddish brown with a white postmedian band forming a W at the lower portion of the hindwing. White forewing cell-end bar often present. This butterfly is tailed.

Rarely seen in many areas in the Coast Ranges and elsewhere. This is another species that uses mistletoe on junipers and other tress for larval host. Adults tend to stay up high on trees, perch on vegetation on hilltops, or come to mud in wet spots. They could turn up anywhere in the park.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

Photo Credit: Bill Bouton 

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         Muir's Juniper Hairstreak (Callophrys muiri)

muirshairstreak_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 inch. The upperside of the male is dark brown with dark orange patches on lower outer edges of wings. The female is tawny with dark margins. The underside of both sexes is dark purple-brown with an iridescent green sheen. The postmedian line is very irregular; dark toward the base of wing and white toward the outer margin. There is a blue-gray patch near hindwing margin that contains 3-4 reddish spots. There are also 3-4 small black spots near this patch. This butterfly has a short tail.

This entity occurs on California Juniper in the Inner Coast Range of Stanislaus County. Adults perch on teh junipers and visit nearby flowers. The flight tends to be late March to mid-May.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

Photo Credit: Adam Winer  cc_by-nc

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         Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus pudica)

grayhairstreak_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 3/8 inches. The upperside is bluish gray with a large red spot near the tail. The underside is dark gray in the spring/fall form and paler gray in the summer form. The postmedian line is white, bordered with orange on the inside edge. There are a few red and blue markings on the hindwing. The abdomen of the female is reddish. There is one tail on the hindwing.

Can turn up virtually everywhere but usually not in numbers like other hairstreaks outside of the cities. Flight spring to fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Western Pygmy-Blue (Brephidium exilis)

brephidiumexilis2_smallDescription: This is a tiny butterfly with a wingspan of between 1/2 and 3/4 of an inch. The upperside is an orangey-brown with blue shading on the bases of the wings. The underside is grayish white towards the base. The forewing is shaded with orange on the outermost half while the hindwing has brown patches in the middle and is edged with dark blue spots lined with gold. The wings are fringed with white.

Common in wastelands in the San Joaquin Valley, this species should occcur in the Inner Coast Ranges into the park. Many host plants used. The flight period is March - November in several broods.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

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       Marine Blue (Leptotes marina) 

marine_blue_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wing span of 7/8 to 1 1/8 inches. The  upperside is blue; male with purple tinge, female with no white. Underside of forewing with unbroken pale brown bands from costa to inner margin.

Not recorded in Santa Clara County but is recorded in Stanislaus County. This species is heavily distributed in Kern and Tulare Counties and should transiently be established further north. It should be recorded in the park. Flight period in the southern San Joaquin Valley tends to largely April - September. The species feeds on several legumes including alfalfa.

Occurrence in Coe: Transient

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         Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas sissona)

eastern_tailed-blue_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/8 inches. The upperside of the male is iridescent blue with brownish gray along the outer margin. The forewings have a short oblique black bar near the middle. The hindwings have a row of submarginal black spots and a small orange spot at the base of each projecting tail. The female's wings are larger and she has longer tails. The female is gray above on the body and wings and has 2 or 3 small orange spots with black dots near the margin of the hindwing. The underside of both sexes is silvery gray with small dark spots and a few orange spots near the margin of the hindwing.

Very rare in Santa Clara County and recorded in the San Joaquin Valley to the east. It may not stray into the park but individuals sometimes do stray. Flight several broods spring to fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Stray

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         Western Tailed-Blue (Cupido amyntula amyntula)

westerntailedblue_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/8 inches. The upperside of the male is blue while the female is brown with blue at the wing base. The underside is white with indistinct black spots and a single small orange spot near the short, narrow tail.

Well known in the Coast Ranges, often in wetter areas near streams or dry areas near Astragalus, Vicia, or Lathyrus whioch are the larval host/ Population explosions can occur after a wildfire that allows Astragalus to prosper. The flight period is March - May and June to August in two broods in the Bay Area. In drier areas or dry years, there may be only one brood.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Western Azure (Celastrina echo echo)

echoazure_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan about 2/3 inches. The upperside of the male is a pale chalky blue. The underside is a pale blue gray with small black spots or dashes. Submarginal row of inward pointing triangular marks.

Should be common inside the park in foothill woodland and mixed confiferous forest. The flight period is February - July.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: © 2015 Nancy Asquith

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         Sonoran Blue (Philotes sonorensis sonorensis)

sonoranblue_158327_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 inch. The upperside is silvery metallic-blue with red and black spots at the outer margin of the forewings. The hindwings of the female also have red spots.

Should occur on the west slope of the Coast Ranges in rocky canyons and hillsides with stonecrop host plants. The flight period is likely to be February into early April. One brood, sometimes as early as January.

Occurrence at Coe: Common

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         Bernardino Blue (Euphilotes bernardino bernardino)

bernardinodotted-blue_158322_smallDescription: This is a tiny butterfly with a wingspan between 11/16 and 13/16 of an inch. The upperside of the male is blue with a narrow black outer margin. The female is brown with an orange submarginal band on the hindwing. The underside is off white with distinct black spots and an orange band on the hindwing.

Not recorded in the region but may be expected in the Inner Coast Range into the park in association with Eriogonum fasciculatum in foothill woodland. The flight can be late April into June.

Occurrence in Coe: Possible

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         Pacific Dotted Blue (Euphilotes enoptes tildeni)

pacificdotted-blue_65167_smallDescription: This is a tiny butterfly with a wingspan between 3/4 and 7/8 of an inch. The upperside of the male is lilac blue with dark borders while the female is brown and usually has an orange patch on the margin of the hindwing. The underside of both sexes is off white with black spots. The spots on the forewing are larger and more squarish than those on the hindwing. There is an orange band on the hindwing which is usually broken into separate spots. This butterfly is geographically variable.

Expected in Stanislaus County in the Inner Coast Ranges where Eriogonum nudum would be the likely host. There is a small brood March - April with a larger brood in late August - mid-September, sometimes into early October. Another subspecies bayensis or smithi may be in Santa Clara County.

Occurrence in Coe: Possible

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         Arrowhead Blue (Glaucopsyche piasus)

arrowheadblue_65542_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 3/8 inches. The upperside of the male is bright blue with wide, dark borders and checkered black and white fringes. The female is duller in color. The underside is pale gray with a median row of black spots and a row of gray chevrons near the margin on both wings. There is a row of white 'arrowheads' pointing inward in between the black spots and gray chevrons on the hindwing.

Very rare and uncommon in the area covered here. Look for this near perennial lupines at higher elevations from March into early June. Unlikely in the Inner Coast Range.

Occurrence in Coe: Rare

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         Silvery Blue (Glaucopsyche lygdamus incognita)

silveryblue_382235_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside of the male is an iridescent blue with narrow dark borders. The female is a darker blue with wide borders. Both sexes have white fringe. The underside of both sexes is a gray-brown and both wings have a row of black spots outlined in white.

Common near deerweed host in foothill woodland and mixed coniferous forest. The flight period is February - June; March - May inland.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: iNaturalist Copyright © 2009 iNaturalist

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         Boisduval's Blue (Plebejus icarioides pardalis)

boisduvalsblue_304279_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 3/8 inches. The upperside of the male is silver-blue to violet-blue with dark margins. The female is completely brown with blue near the wing bases. The underside of both sexes is pale or silver-gray to creamy-tan with black spots on the forewing, black or white spots on the hindwing. The hindwing may also have a marginal crescent row and maybe some rust colored spots.

In foothill woodland and mixed coniferous forest with lupines. Flight April into early June.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photos Credit: Ray Simpson  cc_by_nc_nd

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         Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)

acmonblue_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 3/4 and 1 1/8 inches. The upperside of the male is bright lilac blue with narrow black margins. The hindwing has a pinkish-orange submarginal band surrounding small marginal black dots. The female is dark brown with possibly some blue near the wing bases. The female has a red-orange submarginal band more prominent than the male's. The underside of both sexes is white to gray with many small black dots. There is an orange submarginal band on the hindwing. The outermost row of hindwing black dots have metallic green caps. Fringes are white.

Common throughout the Coast Ranges and must be in the park. Many host plants with multiple broods February - November.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: © 2015 Nancy Asquith

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         Lupine Blue (Plebejus lupini monticola)

lupineblue_63979_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/8 inches. The upperside of the male is lilac blue with wide dark borders. The females are dark brown. There is a wide, orange-red band at the hindwing outer margin. In the male this band may be divided into separate chevrons. The underside of the male is silvery gray with numerous black spots and an orange band on the hindwing. The female is similar but more brownish blue.

Listed for Santa Clara County but status is questionable and unverified. This entity may occur in the Inner Coast Ranges when better explored. Single brood in May and early June.

Occurrence in Coe: Possible

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Metalmark Butterflies (Family Riodiniadae)

Metalmark butterflies are a large grouping of butterfly species found throughout the world. They vary widely in color, but they generally have small metallic-looking spots found on their wings.

         Mormon Metalmark (Apodemia mormo)

mormonmetalmark_320803_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside is orange-brown to black and is checkered with black and white spots. There is a tan to brick-red patch on the forewing. The underside is gray with white spots and there is a brick-red patch on the forewing.

Coast Ranges. The status of this species in the park is unknown and the host is likely to be Eriogonum fasciculatum. The flight is at least mid-August into early October in one brood.

Occurrence in Coe: Possible

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Brush-footed Butterflies (Family Nymphalidae)

Brush-footed butterflies is the largest family of butterflies. They are medium to large butterflies typically having brightly colored wings and small front feet, which are used to taste their food rather than for walking. Most brush-footed butterflies have orange colors on their wings, which can make it difficult to differentiate between the species. 

Monarchs (Subfamily Danainae)

         Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

monarch_small

Description: This is a very large butterfly with a wingspan between 3 3/8 and 4 7/8 inches. The upperside of the male is bright orange with wide black borders and black veins. The hindwing has a patch of scent scales. The female is orange-brown with wide black borders and blurred black veins. Both sexes have white spots on the borders and the apex. There are a few orange spots on the tip of the forewings. The underside is similar to the upperside except that the tips of the forewing and hindwing are yellow-brown and the white spots are larger. The male is slightly larger than the female.

Migrates in the spring and fall. Possible transient populations near milkweeds between migrations. Flight spring to fall, multiple broods.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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Heliconians and Fritillaries (Subfamily Heliconiinae)

 
Gulf Fritillary Coronis Fritillary Callippe Fritillary
Unsilvered Fritillary


True Brush-foots (Subfamily Nymphalinae)
 

Leanira Checkerspot Northern Checkerspot Common Buckeye
Field Crescent Mylitta Crescent Chalcedon Checkerspot
Edith's Checkerspot Satyr Comma Oreas Comma
California Tortoiseshell Mourning Cloak Milbert's Tortoiseshell
American Painted Lady Painted Lady West Coast Lady
Red Admiral


Admirals and Relatives (Subfamily Limenitidinae)
 

Lorquin's Admiral California Sister


Satyrs (Subfamily Satyrinae)

California Ringlet Ox-Eyed Common Wood Nymph Behr's Great Basin Wood Nymph


         Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae incarnata)

gulf_fritillary_smallDescription: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 2 1/2 and 3 3/4 inches. The upperside is bright orange with black markings on the border. The forewing has 3 white dots circled in black on the front edge. The underside is brown with elongated silvery spots. Females are darker with heavier markings.

There are records in the Inner Coast Range area in Stanislaus County and adults may stray into the park. This species might also stray into the west side of the park from cities in Santa Clara County. Flies spring to fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Stray

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         Coronis Fritillary (Speyeria coronis coronis)

coronisfritillary_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 2 and 2 3/4 inches. The upperside is tawny-orange with many black marks including bars near the base, a zigzag band, a row of dots, and several marginal rows of crescents and dashes. The underside is orange with black and silver spots near the forewing tip and the hindwing has rows of silver spots in the disk.There are elongated silver spots in the margin.

Occurs in foothill woodland and in mixed coniferous forests where the violet host occurs. Flight is lat May - September.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Callippe Fritillary (Speyeria callippe comstocki)

callippefritillary_smDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 2 and 2 1/2 inches. The upperside is tawny to bright red-brown with dark markings. The veins have wide black markings. The underside has triangular silver submarginal spots with a narrow brown edging. It has large silvery spots.

Occurs in foothill woodland and in mixed coniferous forest where the violet host occurs. Adults hilltop on summits and ridges. Flight May - early July.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

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         Unsilvered Fritillary (Speyeria adiaste adiaste)

speyeria-adiaste-adiasteDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 2 and 2 3/8 inches. The upperside is tawny to bright brick-red. There are dark markings and dark veins. The female is larger and paler in color. The underside is pale yellow to gray. The hindwing spots barely contrast with the background color.

Tends to occur in Redwood Forests and in mixed coniferous forest where violets grow, often on steep shady slopes where accessibility is poor. Flight generally June - July.

Occurrence in Coe: Possible

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         Leanira Checkerspot (Chlosyne leanira)

leaniracheckerspot_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 3/8 and 1 3/4 inches. The upperside ranges from black to orange with light spots. The underside of the hindwing is cream colored with black veins and a wide black median band surrounding cream colored spots. There are white stripes on the back of the abdomen. This butterfly is quite variable in appearance.

Subspecies could be nominate leanira or nebularem. Occurs locally in foothill woodland with the paintbrush host. One brood April - early June. Adults hilltop and often occur along ridges.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Bill Bouton 

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         Northern Checkerspot (Chlosyne palla)

northern_checkerspot_butterfly_small

Description: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 3/8 and 1 7/8 inches. The upperside of the male is orange or brick-red with black lines and patches. The female is darker, usually cream and black. The underside of the forewing is orange with marginal black, yellowish, and orange rows. The hindwing is reddish with yellowish median bands, a yellow crescent row in a red margin, and yellowish basal spots.

Likely would occur in the Coast Ranges west slope. The likely host in that area is unknown. A checkerspot in foothill woodland and lower coniferous forest. Flight likely April - mid-June. One brood.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchella pulchella)

fieldcrescent_6585_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 3/4 inches. The upperside is orange and black with a yellow median band on the hindwing. There is also a postmedian band of orange spots with black dots in them. The underside of the forewing is yellow-brown with a yellow bar at the cell and small black patches on the inner margin. The hindwing is yellow-brown with rusty markings.

Found in wet meadows, marshes and along streams. Multiple brooded. Flight March - early November.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta mylitta)

mylittacrescent_460732_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/8 and 1 1/2 inches. The upperside is bright reddish orange with narrow dark markings. The underside is yellow-orange with somewhat blurry, rusty orange markings.

Found in foothill woodland and in mixed coniferous forest, often in riparian areas and wet meadows. Multiple brooded March - early November.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: iNaturalist Copyright © 2009 iNaturalist

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         Chalcedon Checkerspot (Euphydryas chalcedona chalcedona)

chalcedoncheckerspot_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 2 1/4 inches. The upperside is black to dark orange-brown with yellow, red, and sometimes white spots. The underside has yellow and orange bands. The forewings are narrow. This butterfly is extremely variable.

Occurs in foothill woodland and lower mixed coniferous forest. Flight can be variable, probably April - July in the park area.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Edith's Checkerspot (Euphydryas editha luestherae)

euphydryas_editha_5679_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 2 inches. The forewing is rounded at the tips. The upperside is black with checkerboard markings of red and pale yellow or white. There is a submarginal band of small yellow or white spots and a wide, red postmedian band. The underside of the hindwing has alternating bands of yellow-orange and cream. This butterfly is variable in appearance.

Occurs in wetter foothill woodland, often along streams or on stream benches. Most likely on the west slope but could also be in the Inner Coast Range. Flight April - June.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

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         Satyr Comma (Polygonia satyrus)

satyrcomma_430387_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 3/4 and 2 1/2 inches. The upperside is bright yellowish orange. The forewing has two black spots near the center of the bottom edge. The hindwing has a black spot in the center of the wing and has a pale border. The wings are scalloped in shape. The underside is light and dark golden brown with a relatively straight median band. There is a silver comma in the center of the hindwing.

Occurs in foothill woodland and mixed coniferous forests in riparian areas and meadows with the nettle ("stinging nettle") host. Adults often occur in small clearings along streams in the late afternoon. Adults also overwinter and may appear on warm winter days. Mostly flies February - early November.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

Photo Credit: Lynette Schimming  cc_by_nc_nd

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         Oreas Comma (Polygonia oreas oreas)

oreascomma_smDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 5/8 and 1 7/8 inches. The upperside is reddish brown with dark distinct borders and yellow chevron shaped submarginal spots.The underside is blackish-gray with a silver, 'L' shaped mark in the center of the hindwing. The wings are scalloped.

Probably confined to more coastal areas but can't be ruled out for the park. Occurs along streams with the host Ribes divaricatum. Flight periods often include early spring for overwintering adults and late June. Adults are often partial to poison oak in small clearings. Best seen after 2 PM.

Occurrence in Coe: Stray

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         California Tortoiseshell (Nymphalis californica californica)

nymphalis_californica_1145_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 2 3/4 inches. The upperside is a rich russet with black blotches on the forewing and dark borders. There are also small white spots near the forewing tips. The underside is a dark mottled brown and looks like a dead leaf. The wings are slightly scalloped.

Migratory and also become transiently established, often using Ceanothus as a host. Potentially occurs spring to fall but can be absent or very rare for several years only to have a population explosion the next.

Occurrence in Coe: Transient

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         Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)

mourningcloak_297106_smallDescription: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 2 1/4 and 4 inches. The upperside is very dark red with a bright yellow border and a row of iridescent blue spots at the inner edge of the border. The underside is dark brown with a tan border and a row of dark blue blotches at the inner edge of the border. There are short projections on both wings and the borders are irregular.

This is a common species often found along watercourses. Flies as early as January and tends to be scarce or absent later in the season.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Elizabeth Carey cc_by_nc_nd

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         Milbert's Tortoiseshell (Aglais milberti subpallida)

aglais_milberti1_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 5/8 and 2 1/2 inches. The upperside is black with wide orange submarginal bands. This orange slightly fades to yellow near the inner edge. There is a narrow black marginal border on both wings. The hindwing border may contain some blue spots. The underside is dark brown fading to lighter brown at the margins. The forewing tips are squared off. This butterfly may be found in the park but we need verification.

Another butterfly of streambeds and nettle patches occurring in higher foothill woodland and mixed coniferous forest. Flights start with overwintering adults with flights varying with weather patterns (especially amount and timing of rainfall). Usually February to early September.

Occurrence in Coe: Possible

Photo Credit: JerryFriedman  cc_by_sa

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         American Painted Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)

americalady_334675_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 3/4 and 2 5/8 inches. The upperside is pinkish orange with black marks across the forewing. The margins are black and the forewing tip has white spots. A row of black rimmed blue spots crosses the outer hindwing. The underside has a complex pattern of olive, black, and white dominated by a large bright pink area on the forewing and two large blue eyespots in an olive field on the hindwing. The forewing tips are extended and rounded.

Occurs early spring to fall. Often most common in some area late summer and early fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Pam Phillips  cc_by_nc_nd

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         Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)

paintedlady_304234_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 2 and 2 7/8 inches. The upperside is orange-brown with darker wing bases. The forewing is pointed and has a black patch on the tip with a white bar and white spots.The hindwing has a row of 5 small black spots and sometimes blue scales. The underside has a mottled black, brown, and gray pattern with 4 submarginal eyespots.

A very common migrant often abundant in the spring and fall with transient populations in between.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Lynette Schimming cc_by_nc_nd

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         West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella)

west_coast_lady_vanessa_annabella_smallDescription: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/2 and 2 1/4 inches. The upperside is orange-brown with an orange bar at the leading edge of the forewing. The hindwing has 3 or 4 submarginal blue spots. The underside has a mottled black, brown, and gray pattern with 4 eye-like spots near the wing margin.

Widespread in the state but rarely found in numbers. Flies year round.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Alan Vernon  cc_by

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         Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta rubria)

redadmiral_small

Description: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 1 3/4 and 3 inches. The upperside is black with white spots near the forewing tips. The forewing has a red-orange median band while the hindwing has a red-orange marginal band. The underside of the leading edge of the forewing is marked with red, white, and blue; otherwise the underside is mostly a mottled gray-brown pattern.

Another nettle feeder often found along streams or in woodland openings near shade. Flies all year round.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia grisea)

commonbuckeye_small

Description: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 1 5/8 and 2 1/4 inches. The upperside is brown with a single large eyespot on each of its upper forewings and two eyespots, one large (with a magenta crescent) and one smaller, on its upper hindwings. There are also two orange bars on the leading edge of the forewing. The underside of the hindwing is brown or tan in summer and rose-red in the fall. There are three eye-like spots on the underside.

Can occur in any habitat in the park. Multiple broods spring to fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini)

lorquinsadmiral_small

Description: This is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan between 2 and 2 5/8 inches. The upperside is black with white median bands on both wings. The tip of the forewings is orange-brown. There are also white spots and a white bar on the leading edge of the forewing. The underside is reddish-brown with white markings.

This is a willow feeder which occurs in streams and marshes with willows. Flight April - October. Multiple broods.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         California Sister (Adelpha californica)

californiasister_small

Description: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 2 1/4 and 4 inches. The upperside is brownish black with a white median band on both wings that is more curved on the hindwing and broken on the forewing. There are orange spots near the end of the white median band on the hindwing. There is an orange patch near the the tip of the forewings but the actual tip is dark. There are small blue wing shaped patches with red centers on the front of the forewing. The underside is complexly marked with auburn, pale blue, orange, and white bands and spots. There are red-brown bars on the forewing and the hindwing.

Occurs in oak woodland and mixed coniferous forest and adults often occur in riparian canyons and visit mud along streams. Flight April - October. Multiple broods.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         California Ringlet  (Coenonympha tullia california or C. california california)

common_ringlet_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/3 and 1 1/2 inches. This butterfly is highly variable in color and number of eyespots. The wings range from dark orange-brown to pale cream. The underside of the forewing usually has a small eyespot near the tip. The underside of the hindwing is gray-green with a wavy white median line. The outer half of both wings is light gray and both wings are divided by an irregular pale band.

These occur in grasslands in foothill woodland and in mixed coniferous forest. Multiple brooded spring to fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: © 2015 Nancy Asquith

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         Ox-Eyed Common Wood Nymph (Cercyonis pegala boopis)

commonwoodnymph_778896_smallDescription: This is a large butterfly with a wingspan between 1 3/4 and 3 inches. This butterfly is geographically variable. The wings are brown. The upperside of the forewing has two large yellow ringed eyespots. The underside of the hindwing has a variable number of small eyespots. Southern and coastal butterflies are larger and have a yellow or yellow-orange patch on the outer part of the forewing. Inland butterflies are smaller and the yellow forewing patch is reduced or absent.

Not always easy to identify from photos. Potentially present late May - early September. Favors wet meadows and marshes with tall grasses.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

Photo Credit: Ken Schneider   cc_by_nc_nd

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         Behr's Great Basin Wood Nymph (Cercyonis sthenele behrii)

greatbasinwoodnymph_62399_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 3/8 and 1 3/4 inches. The upperside is brown. The forewing of the male has 2 small eyespots with the upper one being larger. The forewing of the female has 2 large eyespots of about the same size. Eyespots are equal distance from the outer edge of the wing. The underside of the hindwing is separated by an irregular dark line where the outer half is lighter than the inner half.

These should be in foothill woodland and lower mixed coniferous forest. Behr's Wood Nypmh is not extinct as some believe and is actually present in small numbers in most Coast Ranges south of the Bay, common in the mountains around the southern San Joaquin Valley. It differs from subspecies silvestris by having a well developed band on the hindwing below, compared to indistinct scrawling below in the hindwing of silvestris. These are grass eaters.

Occurrence in Coe: Possible

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Skippers (Family Hesperiidae)

Any of a family of lepidopterous insects that visibly differ from the typical butterflies especially in having hairy stout bodies, smaller wings, and usually hooked antennae.They are called Skippers because of their short, erratic bursts of flight.

Spread-wing Skippers (Subfamily Pyrginae)
 

Northern Cloudywing Sleepy Duskywing Propertius Duskywing
Mournful Duskywing Funereal Duskywing Persius Duskywing
Small Checkered-Skipper Checkered-Skipper Northern White-Skipper
Common Sootywing
 

Grass Skippers (Subfamily Hesperiinae)
 

Fiery Skipper Juba Skipper Western Branded Skipper
Columbian Skipper Lindsey's Skipper Sandhill Skipper
Sachem Rural Skipper Woodland Skipper
Umber Skipper Eufala Skipper
       
          Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades indistinctus)

northerncloudywing_19757_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 7/8 inches. The upperside is dark brown with small, triangular, and not aligned clear spots on the forewing. The male forewing has a costal fold enclosing scent scales. The underside is brown with a gray tinge. The hindwing has two dark bands.

Likely to occur on the west slope of Coast Ranges in Santa Clara County, often found in foothill woodland (host often Lotus crassifolius) or mixed coniferous forest in wetter areas, often near water. Flight likely late March - eraly June. One brood.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

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         Sleepy Duskywing (Erynnis brizo lacustra)

sleepyduskywing_46483_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 3/4 inches. The upperside is blackish brown. The forewing has two wide gray bands and no transparent spots. The male has a costal fold containing yellow scent scales. The female has a patch of scent scales on the 7th abdominal segment. The hindwing is almost completely brown with lighter brown spots. Antennal clubs are blunt.

A hilltopper often found on hilltops and ridges in scrub oak (the larval host) habitats. Flight March - early May in one brood. Potentially on both west and east slopes in both counties.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

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         Propertius Duskywing (Erynnis propertius)

propertiusduskywing_242189_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 3/8 and 1 3/4 inches. The upperside is brown. The forewings have a gray tinge and distinct dark markings. Clear spots are small in the male and large in the female. The underside of the hindwing has well defined spots below the apex. The male has a costal fold containing yellow scent scales. The female has a patch of scent scales on the 7th abdominal segment.

Should be a resident in oak woodland (oaks are the larval hosts) in spring and early summer. May have two broods in some areas. Adults frequent flowers in forest clearings.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Mournful Duskywing (Erynnis tristis tristis)

mournfulduskywing_318505_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 15/16 inches. The upperside of the wings is dark brownish black with some transparent spots. The spots are larger on the females. The underside of the hindwing is dark brown with a row of long white spots near the margin. The male has a costal fold with yellow scent scales and the female has a patch of scent scales on the 7th abdominal segment.

Should be a resident in oak woodland in boath counties. This species is multiple brooded and can fly in spring, summer and fall but in some places may only be double brooded. Males do "hilltop" and favor "ridges".

Occurence in Coe: Common

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         Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis)

funereal_duskywing_erynnis_funeralis_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 5/16 and 1 3/4 inches. The upperside of the wing is black. The forewing has a dull brown patch at the end of each cell. The hindwing has white fringe on the outer margin. The male has a costal fold containing yellow scent scales and the female has a patch of scent scales on the 7th abdominal segment. The forewings are narrow and pointed while the hindwing is somewhat triangular.

Generally rare in the Bay Area but there have been many confirmed sightings in the region including Santa Clara County in 2015. It can occur in any habitat in the park. Multiple broods spring to fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Possible

Photo Credit: Anne Toal  cc_by

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         Persius Duskywing (Erynnis persius)

erynnis_persius_on_a_flower_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/8 and 1 5/8 inches. The upperside is a dark chocolate-brown. The forewing has some clear spots and other dim markings and there is a gray patch at the end of the cell. Males have raised white hairs on the forewing. The hindwings are fringed with darker brown to black and have another fringe that is creamy white. The male has a costal fold containing yellow scent scales and the female has a scent patch on the 7th abdominal segment.

Occurs from about mid-spring to about mid-summer in many areas. It is also possible in the fall in some areas. Often occur near water or even on open slopes with chaparral.

Occurence in Coe: Likely

Photo Credit: Bill Bouton 

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         Small Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus scriptura scriptura)

smallcheckeredskipper_258990_smallDescription: This is a very small butterfly with a wingspan between 3/4 and 1 inch. The upperside is blackish brown. The forewing has small white spots. There are a few hindwing spots and the submarginal row may be absent. The underside of the forewing has the same markings as the upperside. The hindwing is pale with barely contrasting markings. There is a white fringe on the hindwing that is streaked with black only halfway to the edge of the fringe.

Found in drier area where alkali mallow (the larval host) occurs. Most likely found on the west side of San Joaquin Valley or in areas with alkaline soils. Can occur spring to fall, most common in September.

Occurrence in Coe: Possible

Photo Credit: Bob Barber  cc_by_nc_nd

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         Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus communis)

kaldari_pyrgus_communis_01_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 1/2 inches. The upperside of the male is bluish gray while the female is black. Both sexes have large white spots which form median bands across both wings. The fringes on the male are checkered but the black checks often only reach half way to the edge of the fringe. The male has a costal fold with scent scales on the upperside of the forewing. The underside of both wings is dull white with dark gray or olive bands. The spots on the hindwing marginal row are very small while the spots on the submarginal row are larger.

Can occur in both dry and wet areas where the mallow host grows. Spring to fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Kaldari  pd_0_small

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         Northern White-Skipper (Heliopetes ericetorum)

northernwhiteskipper_157900_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 1/2 inches. The upperside of the male is white with narrow black chevrons at the outer margins of the wings. The female has thicker, darker markings and black at the wing bases. The underside of both sexes is white with pale tan markings.

Apparently uncommon in Santa Clara County but probably more common in the inner Coast Range adjacent to the San Joaquin Valley. Multiple brooded spring to fall. It can occur in any habitat in the region.

Occurrence in Coe: Probably

Photo Credit: Nick Block cc_by_nc_nd

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         Common Sootywing (Pholisora catullus)

common_sootywing_pholisora_catullus_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 5/16 inches. The upperside is glossy black with small white spots on the outer third of the forewing. The female has more white spots on the forewing than the male and a submarginal row of spots on the hindwing. The underside of the forewing is the same as the upperside and the hindwing is solid black.

This species tends to occur in drier habitats, but often near water and stream courses or in canyons. Single brooded in some areas; double brooded in others. Local in San Joaquin Valley.

Occurrence in Coe: Probably

Photo Credit: Anne Toal cc_by

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         Fiery Skipper (Hylephila phyleus phyleus)

fieryskipper_445798_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 1/2 inches. The male has wide black scent scales and the underside of the hindwing is scattered with small black spots. The upperside of the female is dark brown with a very irregular orange band. The underside of the female hindwing is pale brown with paler checks. The antennae are very short.

Common in cities where Bermuda Grass (the larval host) grows. Strays into montane areas. Flies April - early November in m ore than one brood.

Occurrence in Coe: Stray

Photo Credit: Stone Lark  cc_by_nc_nd

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         Juba Skipper (Hesperia juba)

jubaskipper_42584_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 5/8 inches. The male is bright orange-brown with a dark border that is toothed inwardly. The female is larger than the male and has more and brighter markings. The underside of the hindwing is greenish orange with large jagged white blotches.

Recorded for the region though unrecorded for the Coast Ranges further south. Two broods: late spring and in late August - October. Host plant grass unknown.

Occurrence in Coe: Probably

Photo Credit: Carol Davis  cc_by_nc_nd

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         Western Branded Skipper (Hesperia colorado)

westernbrandedskipper_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 3/8 inches. The upperside is orange to brown. The underside of the hindwing has a band which maybe complete, made of small or large spots, faint or absent. The forewings are pointed.

A skipper of the Coast Ranges with a flight of August - September. Occurs in drier areas within the Oak foothill woodland ecotone, up to mixed coniferous forest. Subspecies dodgei may occur on the west slope and tildeni in the Inner Coast Ranges.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

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         Columbian Skipper (Hesperia columbia)

columbianskipper_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 5/16 inches. The upperside is bright orange or dark orange with surrounding dark areas. The underside of the hindwing has small bright white spots in the portion closest to the inner margin of the hindwing.

Two broods with flights in the spring and fall. Usually found on hilltops and ridges in the Upper Sonoran Life Zone in foothill woodland.

Occurrence in Coe: Probably

Photo Credit: Bill Bouton

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         Lindsey's Skipper (Hesperia lindseyi lindseyi)

lindseysskipper_198804_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/8 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside of the male is bright yellowish orange with a narrow dark border and a few pale spots. The upperside of the female is duller with more light spots and the ones on the forewing are transparent. The underside of both sexes is light to greenish orange. The hindwing has pale veins and a band of large irregular pale spots.

Occurs in oat grass (larval host) habitat with oaks, adults often visit thistles. One brood second half of May - early June. Unlike many skippers, lindseyi usually does mnot hilltop but in some places it does occur on ridges.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Tom Murray cc_by_nc_nd

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         Sandhill Skipper (Polites sabuleti sabuleti)

sandhillskipper_95711_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside of the male is yellowish orange with dark toothed borders and curvy scent scales on the forewing. The upperside of the female has heavier dark markings and almost transparent light spots. In both sexes, the underside of the hindwing is yellowish tan with yellow veins and dark chevrons between the veins and outer margin, and dark spots at the vein ends. This butterfly can be quiet variable.

Occurs in saltgrass pastures and meadows. Multiple broods spring to fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Carol Davis cc_by_nc_nd

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         Sachem (Atalopedes campestris campestris)

sachem_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 5/8 inches. The upperside of the male forewing is yellowish orange with a wide brown border and large rectangular black scent scales. The female upperside varies from yellowish brown to very dark brown, but always has a square transparent white spot at the end of the forewing cell. The underside of the female hindwing is yellowish brown with a medial band of squarish cream or white spots.

Flies spring to fall but often most common in October. Often found in Bermuda Grass habitats and pastures.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

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         Rural Skipper (Ochlodes agricola)

ruralskipper_407613_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 7/8 and 1 1/8 inches. The upperside is brown with lighter orange-brown patches. The forewing has semi-transparent patches. The male scent scales are gray in the center. The underside is reddish brown and the hindwing has a pale or absent band.

Single brooded April - June. Inner Coast Ranges populations are lighter and unnamed. Occur in woodland, often in riparian woodlands and canyons visiting flowers.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: iNaturalist Copyright © 2009 iNaturalist

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         Woodland Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanoides sylvanoides)

woodlandskipper_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside is tawny orange with toothed brown borders. The males have black scent scales with a dark brown patch just beyond the end of them. In females the borders are a little wider and darker and there are two dark patches where the male's scent scales are. The hindwing has a large reddish patch. The underside is highly variable from yellow to reddish brown. The hindwing varies from unmarked to having a distinct band of cream to yellow spots.

Usually a common butterfly with one flight late August - early October but can occur earlier in July. Occurs in foothill woodland.

Occurrence in Coe: Common

Photo Credit: Joseph Oliver  cc_by-nc

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         Umber Skipper (Poanes melane)

umberskipper_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 1/4 and 1 3/8 inches. The upperside is dark brown. The forewing has a darker disc and pale spots while the hindwing has a light yellowish brown band. The female is larger and lighter colored. The underside resembles the upperside but the spots are larger and lighter. The base of the forewing is black.

This likely occurs inside the park in riparian areas on the west slope of the Coast Ranges in Santa Clara County. Not likely in teh Inner Coast Ranges. Spring to fall near the coast: May - June and late summer - fall in some places.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

Photo Credit:  Mathesont  cc_by-nc

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         Eufala Skipper (Lerodea eufala)

eufalaskipper_smallDescription: This is a small butterfly with a wingspan between 1 and 1 1/4 inches. The upperside is grayish brown and the forewing has 3 to 5 small transparent spots. The underside of the hindwing is brown with heavy gray overscaling and rarely has faint spots.

Most likely to occur in low elevations in either county in pastures or in inhabited areas with lantana (host plants are grasses). Strays into montane areas. April - November but most common late summer and fall.

Occurrence in Coe: Likely

Photo Credit:  Jerry Oldenettel  cc_by_nc_sa

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